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Lazy NPR Reporter Can’t Be Bothered to Check Facts

“Under this theory, Social Security recipients, veterans, government employees, contractors and all the rest would get lower priority; though Tiberi says seniors and veterans should get paid first with whatever is left after interest payments.”

“Under this theory?” Oh, yeah, wait, let’s Google the word “default.” The very first result is from Wikipedia:

“In finance, default occurs when a debtor has not met his or her legal obligations according to the debt contract, e.g. has not made a scheduled payment, or has violated a loan covenant (condition) of the debt contract. A default is the failure to pay back a loan. Default may occur if the debtor is either unwilling or unable to pay his or her debt. This can occur with all debt obligations including bonds, mortgages, loans, and promissory notes.”

If Ms. Keith had spent two minutes doing research instead of coming up with creative language to snipe at Republicans, she would not have embarrassed herself, her show, and NPR this way. Ms. Keith hereby wins the award for lazy NPR reporter can[‘t be bothered to check facts. Continue Reading →

The Current State of the Government Debt

The debt-to-GDP ratio is too high. The U.S. is not Greece or Italy — yet. But if we stay on the current path, at some point an auction of Treasury securities will fail in the sense that there will be no bidders from the private sector. The Fed could bail out Treasury by purchasing the entire new issue. But that is a policy choice that the Fed must make. The really scary part of all this is that nobody knows the debt-to-GDP ratio at which an auction will fail. There will be warnings, however. Watch for rising interest rates on TIPS (Treasury Inflation Protected Securities).
Continue Reading →